ARC

The Tiny Tale of Little Pea by Davide Cali

cover114626-mediumThe Tiny Tale of Little Pea by Davide Cali is a cute story of tiny person. It’s a fun story about Little Pea who finds he is too small to do many things. He finds a job that suits him perfectly and seems to live happily ever after.

The main character, Little Pea, loves life. Little Pea does not realize that he is very tiny until he begins school. It was only at school that he realized that there were things he could not do. He learned that the world is not very accommodating, but he made do with his situation.  In the end Little Pea finds a job, lives in his own home, and has a garden. Most importantly, he is happy. as it’s a fun story about Little Pea who finds he’s too small to do many things. He finds a job that suits him perfectly and seems to live happily ever after.

I received an ARC from NetGalley and Kids Can Press in exchange for an honest review.

Categories: ARC, book review, books, children, Children's Fiction, kids, Kids Can Press, NetGalley, picture books | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Love Story by Karen Kingsbury

cover105549-mediumLove Story by Karen Kingsburg is the book that ties up unanswered questions from the previous books in her series about the Baxter’s. In this book the reader learns the full story of John and Elizabeth Baxter. The reader learns how the couple met and fell in love. The reader learns how the Baxter’s first child was born out of wedlock and that Elizabeth was sent away as a result. The reader learns that Elizabeth was forced to put the baby up for adoption.

I personally have not read the other stories in this series about the Baxter family and as a result I spent most o the book confused. I would recommend reading the other books to know what has happened so you as the reader will not be utterly confused.

Thank you to NetGalley and Howard Books for this ARC in exchange for an honest review.

Categories: ARC, book review, books, Christian, christian fiction, family, fiction, Howard books, Karen Kingsbury, Literary Fiction, NetGalley, Women's Fiction | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Carson Crosses Canada by Linda Bailey

31952702Carson Crosses Canada by Linda Bailey is a cute children’s book about a trip across Canada. Annie makes the journey with her dog from the Pacific to the Atlantic across Canada as they sight see. The illustrations are lively watercolors, intended to capture the spirit of the trip rather than the actual realistic landscape. The pair travels light and their tale is fun.

The story starts on one side of Canada, and ends up on the other side. Carson and his mistress are cheerful and adventurous, and they make sure to have a good time as they travel and camp their way across the country. The vibe is upbeat and energetic. Carson is a peppy sort of dog and adds a good deal of personality to the trip.

I received this ARC copy from Penguin Random House Canada and Tundra Books via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

Categories: Adventure, animals, ARC, book review, books, Canada, children, Children's Fiction, Children's literature, dog, geography, kids, NetGalley, Penguin Random House Canada, picture books, story times, travel, Tundra Books | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Super Women: Six Scientists Who Changed the World

32080177Super Women: Six Scientists Who Changed the World shares biographies of six female scientists, whose discoveries have had an immeasurable impact on the world, but due to their gender, have been forgotten by history.  This book includes biographies about Shark expert Eugenie Clark, Medical researcher Gertrude Elion and NASA ‘computer’ Katherine Coleman Johnson. This is an important book that needed to be written and read. It tells the story of six little known women pioneers in science. It’s important that their stories are told and that girls are actively encouraged to pursue STEM careers.

Each mini-biography is written with an interesting introductory scene of their most important achievement then gives a brief explanation of their lives. This is a longer read, but the women and fields of study are captivating. It’s incredible to think of how many women were able to move into scientific fields only because of WWII and the “Rosy the Riveter” era of letting women into the work force. I almost wish that this book would have focused in a little bit more on some of that background history. Also, the vocabulary is rather elevated with very few context clues or explanations, so if a younger student was reading this, they would need a lot of help.

I received this ARC copy from Myrick Marketing & Media, LLC and Holiday House via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

Categories: ARC, biographical, biography, book review, children, Children's literature, Children's Nonfiction, history, Middle grade, NetGalley, nonfiction, Science, STEM, women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Sing Freedom! by Vanita Oelschlager

25186289Sing Freedom! by Vanita Oelschlager is an inspiring a non-fiction story about Estonia, a small country near Russia, and its journey to regain independence after years of communist invasion. The book contained a great amount of historical information as well as geographical information. Invaded by USSR and Germany during WW2, communism later led to the demise of Estonia’s flag, songs and customs. This is the story of how the people of Estonia revolted in song instead of violent actions

The story tells how Estonia, a small European country, won its freedom from the former Soviet Union by showing that the spirit of a people is stronger than tanks and bullets. They showed their spirit by singing together in song. It is a tastefully written and illustrated book for children about the unique singing revolution vs. a violent revolution that could have resulted in bloodshed. The illustrations are well done and easily communicate the mood with the colors and human expressions. A great book to use to discuss revolution and how to change something peacefully.

I received this ARC copy from Vanita Books via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

Categories: ARC, biographical, book review, books, children, Children's literature, Children's Nonfiction, diversity, estonia, Europe, European, freedom, NetGalley, singing, Soviet Union, USSR, Vanita Books | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

How Different It Was: Canadians at the Time of Confederation

31252292How Different It Was: Canadians at the Time of Confederation is a wonderful book that focuses on the who, the why, and the how as it pertains to the Confederation in Canadian history. The book gives the reader a glimpse into Canadian confederation life.

How Different It Was focuses on how people lived, interacted, their interests, how they entertained, how they treated one another, and how animals were treated. The author does an excellent job of outlining an overview of the many peoples who came to Canada to settle, and demonstrates how it’s distinctively rural life differed both from British and American models over the years. The author focuses on troubling aspects of Canadian history such as treatment of First Nation peoples, and how long it took to begin to redress the mistreatment.

I received an ARC copy from Dundurn and A J. Patrick Boyer Book via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

Categories: A J. Patrick Boyer Book, ARC, book review, books, Canada, children, Children's literature, Children's Nonfiction, culture, Dundurn, education, history, NetGalley | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

That Burning Summer by Lydia Syson

28695904That burning summer is a really interesting story of a romance that develops between a British girl and a Polish pilot who she finds honest her home after he is forced out of his plane by parachute. I really enjoyed watching their relationship develop and seeing the world through their eyes particularly in the way he worried about being treated by others.

It is set in rural England during the Second World War. We are introduced to Peggy, a sixteen year old, who one day, during her daily chores, stumbles across someone who she does not expect to meet – a young Polish pilot named Henryk. Neither are sure whether or not to trust each other, but they do begin to bond until Ernest, Peggy’s younger brother, finds Henryk and becomes suspicious. Not only are there obvious difficulties with knowing who to trust or not during a war, we also sometimes have to wonder whether one family member can trust the family member as there are is also an interesting subplot regarding Peggy and Ernest’s father. I believe that the main focus of the story is intended to be the gradual building relationship between Peggy and Henryk, but there felt like there was a lot more to think about or to consider if you weren’t actually interested in ‘romance’.

I enjoyed the historical information about WWII that Syson included in the story and the experiences of the characters. Rather than feeling like the book merely took place during WWII, it felt like the characters were actually experiencing and living through the events.

I received this ARC from Skyhorse Publishing and Sky Pony Press via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

Categories: ARC, book review, books, historical fiction, history, romance, Sky Pony Press, Skyhorse Publishing, WWII, YA, young adult | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Rooting for Rafael Rosales by Kurtis Scaletta

32672758Rooting for Rafael Rosales by Kurtis Scaletta is the story two story strands with different points of view in different time periods. The first character; Rafael, the baseball player, from the Dominican Republic as a boy and as a young man. The second character; Maya, a young tween from Minneapolis. It’s certainly not a typical format for a book, this one pulls it off nicely. At first, the jumping back and forth can feel a bit jarring to the reader, but the flow back and forth starts to make sense, as events from one time and place compliment and inform events from the other time and place.

It also takes the story on from the viewpoint of a character who is not a baseball fanatic, which will be helpful to readers who are not as interested in the game of baseball. For though this is a baseball book, it’s not a story that centers on a game of baseball. Rather, that is simply the common element that exists throughout and the connective tissue between the different times and characters. Readers will discover more about the characters’ lives, ambitions, and Rafael’s hardships through the reading than anything that is particularly baseball centered.

I received this ARC from Albert Whitman & Company via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

Categories: ARC, book review, books, children, Children's Fiction, Children's literature | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Yes, Let’s by Galen Goodwin Longstreth

16000413Yes, Let’s by Galen Goodwin Longstreth is a story about a family day in the woods, from sun-up to sun-down. The rhyming text takes the reader through waking up, packing gear, riding there, hiking, playing, swimming, eating, and eventually sleepily returning home. Every sentence begins with “Let’s,” inviting the reader to join in the fun. The understated verse conjures up visual images.  The illustrator shows a family that mostly enjoys each other, at least most of the time. There is lot’s of humor in the illustrations, as well as details hinting at the personalities of each family member.

I received this ARC from Tanglewood Press via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review

Categories: ARC, book review, books, children, Children's Fiction, Children's literature, Children's Nonfiction, children's poetry, family, Galen Goodwin Longstreth, NetGalley, Tanglewood | Leave a comment

Different? Same! by Heather Tekavec

cover100357-mediumDifferent? Same! by Heather Tekavec is a beautiful and playful animal book that seeks to engage young readers by pointing out differences between groupings of widely different animals and then asking what similarity exists. The similarity might be stripes, horns, whiskers or shells.

It is wonderfully written and beautifully illustrated. While the book is for young children (ages 2-5) I read it to my 5th and 6th grade students who enjoyed the book very much. It makes you consider animals in different ways and think about why these vastly different animals might all have horns, whiskers, shells, etc. We had fun with the last page of the book, pointing at various animals that all had a particular characteristic.

On each two-page spread, there are four animals. The animals each something about themselves or their habitat and each thing is different. Then we are told what they have in common or how they all the same, such as they have stripes or scales or tusks etc. I loved the science behind this but it is so much more than that. The message that no matter how different we all are, we are still all the same, we are human is a message that needs to be reiterated over and over. The illustrations are wonderful, so cute and playful. The vocabulary is descriptive, yet simple. the only complaint I have is that the animals are not named. It would be nice if they had been labeled so that children could ask questions and get further information. If they do not know what the animal is, that could prove to be difficult.

Thank you to Kids Can Press and NetGalley for this ARC. I received this book in exchange for an honest review.

Categories: animals, ARC, book review, books, children, Children's literature, Children's Nonfiction, Kids Can Press, NetGalley | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

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