Posts Tagged With: Women’s Fiction

Desert Moon by Susan Page Davis

cover104637-mediumDesert Moon by Susan Page Davis is a wonderful historical fiction. The story takes place in Arizona. There is a sweet romance throughout the story with a little bit of danger and mystery added. The story begins fast with a stage coach robbery and then blames of the crime are made and with evidence.

The main character, Julia Newman, is a young lady that makes the difficult decisions. Julia receives double bad news in a short amount of time. First she learns of her mother’s death, then she learns that her brother is accused of robbing a stagecoach and the person who informed her is the man that Julie has always love, Deputy Adam Scott.

Julie left home to go to school to become a teacher because she could not stand to be near the man she loved, Deputy Adam Scott.  On her way home, Julie learns that the stagecoach she is riding in has been robbed. Deputy accused Julie’s brother of the crime, which frustrates her. Julie tries to convince Deputy Adam Scott of her brother’s innocence but then finds out that her brother has gone mission.  During this exchange, Julie discovers that her feelings for Deputy Adam Scott has not gone away as she hoped would happen when she went away to school.

 

Thank you to NetGalley and Barbour Books for the ARC in exchange for an honest review.

Categories: book review, Christian, christian fiction, Christian Romance, historical fiction, history, NetGalley, Review, romance, Women's Fiction | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Promise Girls by Marie Bostwick

cover107453-mediumThe Promise Girls by Marie Bostwick is a story about child prodigies who were created in the womb for greatness, promised success, prodded by their mother. They were perfectly planned and then everything changed when one of the Promise girls decided to be not so perfect on live TV. Fast forward, twenty years later the story picks up to tell us what the Promise sisters are up to and how they are getting along. One is married, one is a single parent and the third is a mermaid. All have issues to deal with from their childhood. None of them are doing what their mother pushed them toward. The catalyst of a major life threatening accident and the need for money encourages the sisters to do a documentary that will tell the world what happened to “The Promise Girls” once they became adults.

As revelations were made about what happened after the debacle on live TV and how it impacted each of the girls, I wished that their lives could have been different. Passion and promise are not the only things that create professional superstar status. There has to be drive and will and belief in oneself that the sisters seemed to lose at points in their lives. Each sister thrived in her own way and by the end of the book all three sisters eventually were be able to enjoy their talents and gifts and realize the promise their lives held in store for the future.

I received this ARC from Kensington Books via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

Categories: Advanced readers copy, ARC, book review, books, women, Women's Fiction | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Abby’s Journey by Steena Holms

cover95941-mediumAbby’s Journey by Steena Holms is the sequel to the  Saving Abbey. It tells the story of Abby’s childhood living with her father Josh. Her mother Claire died shortly after Abby was born but Abby has a real connection with her mother because Claire had written letters to both Josh and Abby to help guide them through her childhood. She had also left her beautiful illustrations in the books she wrote for children with her husband Josh, videos, journals and postcards, all that brought her mother nearer and nearer to Abby.

Abby was born with bronchopulmonary dysplasia a condition which could easily see a simple every-day cold become life threatening pneumonia. Josh had sat at her bedside in hospital time after time, praying that she had the strength. When she was twenty years of age she begged her father to let her move to a flat-share, but he was reluctant to let her move out. Nobody knew Abby as well as he did or would look after her health needs as he did. Reluctantly Josh agreed to let Abby go on a trip to Europe with Millie, her maternal grandmother, retracing her mother’s footsteps and taking her travel journal with her. She not only looked like her mother, but also her thirst for travel adventures was equal to Claire’s. This is the story of Abbey’s first ever holiday without her father, but guided by her mother. Like her mother she documents her travels, sending out postcards, texts and filling her blog with interesting facts and experiences. She was at last living the life she had always hoped she would.

This is a heart-warming story about parental love, family love and friendship. In the various locations that Abby visits she meets people who knew her mother and had kept mementos of her visit. She uses her mother’s journals to connect to the places she visits and she has the time of her life. She also discovers a family secret that her mother had anticipated and another letter for both Josh and Abby helped her to accommodate and assimilate this information with her mother’s wise words.

I loved the gorgeous descriptions Steena Holmes created of the beautiful places Millie and Abby visited. I only wished I was there to share her experiences.

I received this ARC book from Lake Union Publishing via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

Categories: Adventure, book review, books, culture, fiction, first reads, historical fiction, Lake Union Publishing, NetGalley, Review, Women's Fiction | Tags: , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Sisters One, Two and Three by Nancy Star

29806089Sisters One, Two and Three by Nancy Star is a story told from Ginger’s perspective. The plot moves between the 1970s and today. Ginger is the oldest of four siblings, and in the 1970s a tragic event redefined her family.

The three sisters, all very different, come together after the death of their mother.  Ginger is the the eldest who is the overanxious hypochondriac. Mimi is the laissez-faire soccer Mom extraordinaire. Lastly, Callie is the youngest and the wanderer whom, as of late, has been on one of her famous disappearing acts. The three finally converge at their Martha’s Vineyard home and, finally, are forced to confront the tragedy from their childhood that has plagued them all for years.

The characters in this novel are well thought out and unique, as well as realistic and flawed. This novel has great style, flow and is very easy to read. I was overjoyed when the format on my E-reader copy was clear, and I could easily engage.

Thank you to Netgalley and the Lake Union Publishing for an opportunity to read an advance copy.

Categories: book review, books, family, fiction, friendships, Lake Union Publishing, Nancy Star, NetGalley, Review, Women's Fiction | Tags: , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Birds in the Air by Frances O’Roark Dowell

cover96917-mediumBirds in the Air by Frances O’Roark Dowell is a wonderful story. I loved the book from the first page to the last page. The book involves a woman whose family moves to a small town in the mountains. Her husband and daughter settle in quickly with job and school, but Emma needs something to do. Finding an old quilt in an attic trunk is the catalyst for searching out the local quilt shop. She is not a quilter to start with, but that quickly changes. Through a series of events, she ends up learning to quilt as well as becoming the publicist for the local guild’s quilt show. Some of the members do not agree that an outside should have such an important role. Conflict with another guild member creates a disaster for the quilt show, and help comes from an unlikely source. The story is interesting and told in an easy to read style, and I found it difficult to put down. I also like that Emma is happily married, as many of these series begin with a divorce so the woman can find her own way. I like that a married woman can also find her own way while having a family and a committed relationship.

There are several reasons I loved this book.

First, the characters. The characters are realistic and true to life. Second, I could related to the life styles characterized by several of the characters. Third, I like  how Frances uses quilting terms through out the book. Fourth, I like that the author brought the conflict of “quilt divas” to the story which brings to like the quilting industry that not everyone is kind at all times. The author brings past quilting history and highlights how functions in a community both in the past and in current times. I love how the author makes community building such a central theme in the story. Lastly, fifth, the authors deals with quilting controversy within the story and it makes the story appear that much more realistic.

I received this book from Milton Falls Media, Inc. via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review

Categories: arts and crafts, Birds in the Air, book review, books, Crafts & Hobbies, family, fiction, Frances O'Roark Dowell, Literary Fiction, literature, Milton Falls Media, NetGalley, Relationships, Review, Women's Fiction | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Bury the Living by Jodi McIsaac

29371079Bury the Living by Jodi McIsaac is a historical fiction book with a little bit of fantasy.

Nora O’Reilly has a knack for getting into trouble. That’s not good when she lives in Ireland’s Troubles. After losing her family, Nora becomes an Aid worker. Now she is plagued by dreams of a man she has never known. She ends up connecting with the Brigidine Sisters, who venerate Saint Brigid, who was a pagan patron of Ireland long before the Catholic Church, when she was part of the Tuatha Dé Danann. A relic takes Nora back to the Irish Civil War, a much different war than The Troubles. She is trying to help Michael break the curse on him to be immortal until Ireland is free of it’s enemies. This curse is quite the challenge if you know the history of Ireland.

The beginning is 1990, skips to 2005 and then time travels backwards to 1923 amidst the Irish Civil War. This is where the author excels because she doesn’t lose you in the “travel”. We see the violence of present day Belfast and the devastation of the early 1920s. It is important to understand that Ireland has been at war for hundreds of years beginning with the Normans in the late 12th century which marked the beginning of more than 800 years of English rule or involvement. Wars, uprisings, revolutions, rebellions, civil wars, riots and bombings have plagued much of Ireland’s history. We become aware of the sacrifices, decisions, fears and worries of the mothers, daughters, sons and fathers through the lives and eyes of the women Nora meets. I really liked and appreciated this perspective. The portrayal of this time period was vividly done. It was gut retching to read. The research was remarkable and the Historical Note at the end is a must.

It can be difficult to bring together two different time periods and the author needs to expertly weave all the threads of both worlds seamlessly together to create a smooth flowing and flawless story. This was done very well and effortlessly. There were frequent references of present day Ireland going through Nora’s head while she was “living” in 1923.

I received this book from 47North via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

Categories: Adventure, book review, books, fiction, history, Literary Fiction, NetGalley, Review | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Mount Hope: An Amish Retelling of Jane Austen’s Mansfield Park by Sarah Price

29241488Mount Hope: An Amish Retelling of Jane Austen’s Mansfield Park by Sarah Price starts out in a small Amish community in Colorado. In the beginning of the story Fanny Price finds out that she and her brother will be leaving the family, and each will be living with different family members on the East coast. In less than thiry-six hours, Fanny is living with her aunt and family in Mount Hope, Ohio. Feeling out of place at the Bontrager farm, Fanny finds a friend in her older cousin, Elijah Bontrager.

As years have passed, Fanny has not over come her shyness, preferring solitude, but is very observant. Her relationship with Elijah takes a shift in a different direction. Fanny finds herself conflicted as to what to do about it. When her uncle presses her to marry a guy she doesn’t feel is worthy of her hand, Fanny can’t seem to find it in herself to tell her uncle the whole truth. It’s what her uncle does and the events afterwards that the eyes are opened!

Sarah Price writes with ease, that makes the story flow smoothly, and not missing a bit of details. Her characters take on human-like persona. Sarah stays true to the Amish culture and faith of the area she’s writing about, but most importantly of Amish districts and people.

I received this book from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

Categories: Adventure, america, Amish, book review, books, Charisma House, Christian, culture, Literary Fiction, NetGalley, Realms, Review, Women's Fiction, Women's Fiction, Literary Fiction | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

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