Posts Tagged With: history

Desert Moon by Susan Page Davis

cover104637-mediumDesert Moon by Susan Page Davis is a wonderful historical fiction. The story takes place in Arizona. There is a sweet romance throughout the story with a little bit of danger and mystery added. The story begins fast with a stage coach robbery and then blames of the crime are made and with evidence.

The main character, Julia Newman, is a young lady that makes the difficult decisions. Julia receives double bad news in a short amount of time. First she learns of her mother’s death, then she learns that her brother is accused of robbing a stagecoach and the person who informed her is the man that Julie has always love, Deputy Adam Scott.

Julie left home to go to school to become a teacher because she could not stand to be near the man she loved, Deputy Adam Scott.  On her way home, Julie learns that the stagecoach she is riding in has been robbed. Deputy accused Julie’s brother of the crime, which frustrates her. Julie tries to convince Deputy Adam Scott of her brother’s innocence but then finds out that her brother has gone mission.  During this exchange, Julie discovers that her feelings for Deputy Adam Scott has not gone away as she hoped would happen when she went away to school.

 

Thank you to NetGalley and Barbour Books for the ARC in exchange for an honest review.

Categories: book review, Christian, christian fiction, Christian Romance, historical fiction, history, NetGalley, Review, romance, Women's Fiction | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

My Heart Belonds in the Superstition: Carmela’s Quandry by Susan Page Davis

30838280My Heart Belongs in the Superstition Mountains: Carmela’s Quandry by Susan Page Davis is the second book in the My Heart Belongs series. Carmela’s Quandry is a Christian Western with a touch of romance. It is set in 1866 in the Arizona Territory. The story has lots of detail which allows for the reader to feel that they are there in the middle of the story. A wonderful story that allows the reader to see the inner beauty in people.

Carmela lost her parents on the trail to California at a young age and since that point her uncle has been exploiting her for years. At first Carmela was cared for by friends until her uncle could arrive. Her parents owed money that Carmela’s uncle was now responsible for paying. Since the uncle didn’t have the money he guilted and punished Carmela by forcing her to tell a fake story that the uncle invented. The story is that she has been a victim of an Indian attack, later the uncle forces her to tour the country telling the story he invented. He even drew tattoos on her face because that mimicked what tribes often did to captives. Carmela is now twenty and is almost of age to be able to break away from her Uncle and stop speaking to crowds of people and telling them something that are lies.

Freeman McKay is a lawman who is transporting a dangerous prisoner by stage. He is riding along with a prisoner he is transporting when the stagecoach they are on is robbed. The bad guys leave Carmela and Freeland handcuffed together in the desert and ride off with their loot. Freeman is unconscious from the attack. Several hours go by and Carmela is brought water by a mysterious Indian warrior. That water saved their lives. Freeman and Carmela have to make their way to Prescott so that she can settle and be safe. Carmela and Freeman develop a relationship of trust. Carmela tells Freeman of the secret that she has been forced by her uncle to lie to crowds of people for money.

I liked that Carmela was able to find true happiness. The story is captivating. It’s a story of faith and the healing virtue of friendship and love.

I received an ARC from NetGalley via Barbour Publishing, Inc. in exchange for an honest review.

Categories: Barbour Books, Barbour Publishing, book review, Christian, christian fiction, Christian Romance, historical fiction, history, NetGalley | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Super Women: Six Scientists Who Changed the World

32080177Super Women: Six Scientists Who Changed the World shares biographies of six female scientists, whose discoveries have had an immeasurable impact on the world, but due to their gender, have been forgotten by history.  This book includes biographies about Shark expert Eugenie Clark, Medical researcher Gertrude Elion and NASA ‘computer’ Katherine Coleman Johnson. This is an important book that needed to be written and read. It tells the story of six little known women pioneers in science. It’s important that their stories are told and that girls are actively encouraged to pursue STEM careers.

Each mini-biography is written with an interesting introductory scene of their most important achievement then gives a brief explanation of their lives. This is a longer read, but the women and fields of study are captivating. It’s incredible to think of how many women were able to move into scientific fields only because of WWII and the “Rosy the Riveter” era of letting women into the work force. I almost wish that this book would have focused in a little bit more on some of that background history. Also, the vocabulary is rather elevated with very few context clues or explanations, so if a younger student was reading this, they would need a lot of help.

I received this ARC copy from Myrick Marketing & Media, LLC and Holiday House via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

Categories: ARC, biographical, biography, book review, children, Children's literature, Children's Nonfiction, history, Middle grade, NetGalley, nonfiction, Science, STEM, women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

How Different It Was: Canadians at the Time of Confederation

31252292How Different It Was: Canadians at the Time of Confederation is a wonderful book that focuses on the who, the why, and the how as it pertains to the Confederation in Canadian history. The book gives the reader a glimpse into Canadian confederation life.

How Different It Was focuses on how people lived, interacted, their interests, how they entertained, how they treated one another, and how animals were treated. The author does an excellent job of outlining an overview of the many peoples who came to Canada to settle, and demonstrates how it’s distinctively rural life differed both from British and American models over the years. The author focuses on troubling aspects of Canadian history such as treatment of First Nation peoples, and how long it took to begin to redress the mistreatment.

I received an ARC copy from Dundurn and A J. Patrick Boyer Book via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

Categories: A J. Patrick Boyer Book, ARC, book review, books, Canada, children, Children's literature, Children's Nonfiction, culture, Dundurn, education, history, NetGalley | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Children of the Past: Archaeology and the Lives of Kids by Lois Miner Huey

cover107828-mediumChildren of the Past: Archaeology and the Lives of Kids by Lois Miner Huey is a nonfiction children’s book that introduces young readers to both the methods of archaeologists and to the lives of children throughout Western history, focusing specifically on:
• Western Europe 18,000 B.C.E.
• Hunter-Gatherers Europe 6000 B.C.E.
• Iroquois North America 1000 C.E.
• Jamestown Colony Virginia 1600s
• Free African-American settlement of Fort Mose Florida 1700s

There are not many books that focus on archaeology for kids. Huey uses graphics throughout.  Each section begins with a map to place the location in context and the book is filled with color photographs of cave art, digs, stone tools, pots, and other artifacts.

The book covers the basics of life in the time periods, focusing on what archaeology reveals was the role of children in their respective societies. For example, how scientists have proven that much cave art was produced by children or the possible training children went through to learn how to make stone tools or clay pots.  Huey does a nice job in beginning with each section with a brief second person narrative.

The book is not long but it is heavy information.

I received this ARC from Lerner Publishing Group and Hillbrook Press via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

Categories: book review, books, children, Children's literature, Children's Nonfiction, Hillbrook Press, history, Lerner Publishing Group, NetGalley, Review | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Katharina and Martin Luther: The Radical Marriage of a Runaway Nun and a Renegade Monk by Michelle DeRusha

30259182Katharina and Martin Luther: The Radical Marriage of a Runaway Nun and a Renegade Monk by Michelle DeRusha gave a vivid picture of 2 individuals whose path led to each other and to changing the course of history. It shares personal details of their lives, childhoods separated from family and risking capture, the escape to new lives. They married as virtual strangers but over time they grew to love and admire each other.
The book was extremely well written and researched. When reading you get a glimpse of what life was like at the time, and how Katharina and Martin called on their faith and each other to share their progressive thoughts.
This is a very intimate view of someone who hundreds of years later is a household name. It presents Martin Luther as very human, with doubts and fears, but with courage and the support of a loving relationship, gave Christians another way to live in faith.

I received this advanced reader’s copy from Baker Books via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

Categories: Baker Books, book review, books, Christian, NetGalley, Review | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Hedy’s Journey by Michelle Bisson

cover109383-mediumHedy’s Journey by Michelle Bisson is a horrific, true story about a Hungarian Jewish girl named Hedy who had to travel through Germany during the Holocaust in search of safety. She takes a portion of the journey to America alone, as she is required to separate from her parents.

She and her family suffered through trials and tribulations on the unpredictable journey. Plans often changed, and she had no choice but to be brave. Follow along in the story to learn there destination and future.

The author, Michelle Bisson, is Hedy’s daughter. She tells the story of Hedy’s (Hungarian Jewish) journey to safety, from the Nazis to the US. The story is sort of passing of the baton. Someone has to continue to tell their stories, history in its worst manifestation, and I appreciated the effort of this daughter. The story is told with extreme delicacy and the designs convey this emotion. I truly appreciate that she has taken the story about her mother’s experience and offered it to others so that they can retain this piece of history that is so essential to children’s education. In addition, I appreciated the author mentioning that it wasn’t just Jews who were persecuted.

The book also contains lots of photographs of Hedy and her family as well as a timeline of events. This book is one I believe should be integral to children’s curriculums and should be in every library.

I received this ARC book from Capstone and Capstone Press via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

Categories: book review, books, Capstone, capstone press, Children's literature, Children's Nonfiction, family, Germany, hero, history, Holocaust, Middle grade, Nazi, NetGalley, war, WWII | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Bury the Living by Jodi McIsaac

29371079Bury the Living by Jodi McIsaac is a historical fiction book with a little bit of fantasy.

Nora O’Reilly has a knack for getting into trouble. That’s not good when she lives in Ireland’s Troubles. After losing her family, Nora becomes an Aid worker. Now she is plagued by dreams of a man she has never known. She ends up connecting with the Brigidine Sisters, who venerate Saint Brigid, who was a pagan patron of Ireland long before the Catholic Church, when she was part of the Tuatha Dé Danann. A relic takes Nora back to the Irish Civil War, a much different war than The Troubles. She is trying to help Michael break the curse on him to be immortal until Ireland is free of it’s enemies. This curse is quite the challenge if you know the history of Ireland.

The beginning is 1990, skips to 2005 and then time travels backwards to 1923 amidst the Irish Civil War. This is where the author excels because she doesn’t lose you in the “travel”. We see the violence of present day Belfast and the devastation of the early 1920s. It is important to understand that Ireland has been at war for hundreds of years beginning with the Normans in the late 12th century which marked the beginning of more than 800 years of English rule or involvement. Wars, uprisings, revolutions, rebellions, civil wars, riots and bombings have plagued much of Ireland’s history. We become aware of the sacrifices, decisions, fears and worries of the mothers, daughters, sons and fathers through the lives and eyes of the women Nora meets. I really liked and appreciated this perspective. The portrayal of this time period was vividly done. It was gut retching to read. The research was remarkable and the Historical Note at the end is a must.

It can be difficult to bring together two different time periods and the author needs to expertly weave all the threads of both worlds seamlessly together to create a smooth flowing and flawless story. This was done very well and effortlessly. There were frequent references of present day Ireland going through Nora’s head while she was “living” in 1923.

I received this book from 47North via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

Categories: Adventure, book review, books, fiction, history, Literary Fiction, NetGalley, Review | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Mount Hope: An Amish Retelling of Jane Austen’s Mansfield Park by Sarah Price

29241488Mount Hope: An Amish Retelling of Jane Austen’s Mansfield Park by Sarah Price starts out in a small Amish community in Colorado. In the beginning of the story Fanny Price finds out that she and her brother will be leaving the family, and each will be living with different family members on the East coast. In less than thiry-six hours, Fanny is living with her aunt and family in Mount Hope, Ohio. Feeling out of place at the Bontrager farm, Fanny finds a friend in her older cousin, Elijah Bontrager.

As years have passed, Fanny has not over come her shyness, preferring solitude, but is very observant. Her relationship with Elijah takes a shift in a different direction. Fanny finds herself conflicted as to what to do about it. When her uncle presses her to marry a guy she doesn’t feel is worthy of her hand, Fanny can’t seem to find it in herself to tell her uncle the whole truth. It’s what her uncle does and the events afterwards that the eyes are opened!

Sarah Price writes with ease, that makes the story flow smoothly, and not missing a bit of details. Her characters take on human-like persona. Sarah stays true to the Amish culture and faith of the area she’s writing about, but most importantly of Amish districts and people.

I received this book from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

Categories: Adventure, america, Amish, book review, books, Charisma House, Christian, culture, Literary Fiction, NetGalley, Realms, Review, Women's Fiction, Women's Fiction, Literary Fiction | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The California Gold Rush Romance Collection

28114246The California Gold Rush Romance Collection by Amanda Barratt, Angela Bell, Dianne Christner, Anne Greene, Linda Farmer Harris, Cynthia Hickey, Pam Hillman, Jennifer Rogers Spinola, Jaime Jo Wright is a delightful collection of stories from nine talented and very creative authors. The plots are diverse. The California Gold Rush Romance Collection is really no different than any other romance collection, but there are a couple of stand-out novellas. The Golden Cross and Gold Haven Heiress are two that don’t really fit into the mold and really are intriguing. The Golden Cross tells the story of a man and his niece immigrating from China to find gold, but they find something more they can do that is more valuable than gold. The Gold Haven Heiress tells the story from Thalia’s viewpoint, and Thalia is a girl who has lived a long life for her few years. She has settled in the ghost town of Gold Haven because it allows her to be alone. When Jack Taylor moves in, that messes up her plans to live a solitary life.

I give the stories In the California Gold Rush Collection four out of five stars.

I received this book from Barbour Publishing, Inc. via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

Categories: Barbour Publishing, book review, books, Christian, fiction, friendships, history, NetGalley, Relationships | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

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