Posts Tagged With: Children’s Nonfiction

The Way Downtown by Inna Gertsberg

cover114613-mediumThe Way Downtown by Inna Gertsberg is a wonderful book that teaches about public transport in the city. The book covers details about several aspects of public transportation; such as, tickets, trams, trolleybuses, modern light transportation trains. The illustrations are wonderful. They are simple but interesting through the transportation and maps.

Throughout the book the reader “meets” a few families as they take public transportation. A couple of the families are; the Zanies are street performers who take public transportation where they perform on the didgeridoo and juggle and Dr. Brody takes a ferry to go to work each day. The maps, explanations of the sights and sounds are useful to kids. The book even gives advice on what to do if someone gets lost. The pictures are both helpful and hilarious.

I received this ARC from NetGalley and Kids Can Press in exchange for an honest review.

Categories: book review, books, Canada, Canadian, children, Children's Nonfiction, downtown, kids, Kids Can Press, NetGalley, picture books, public transportation, transportation, travel | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Fight to Learn by Laura Scandiffio

cover87601-mediumFight to Learn by Laura Scandiffio brings interest and excitement to going to school. While most people have heard of Malala, they may not have heard of all of the great people in Scandiffio’s book: people helping to change education for poverty-stricken Indians and Roma, Pakistanis denied an education because of their gender, children ripped away from schools becoming soldiers, and separate, but not equal, schools on First Nation land.

Liked that the book was divided into different challenges children face rather than by geography. It even included an example in the U.S. I also liked that the book highlighted the people, many of whom are children, who are finding solutions to this issue.

A fantastic resource for older students.

I received an ARC copy from Annick Press via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review

Categories: Annick Press, book review, books, Children's Nonfiction, Middle grade, multi-cultural, Multicultural Interest, NetGalley, nonfiction, Review | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Super Women: Six Scientists Who Changed the World

32080177Super Women: Six Scientists Who Changed the World shares biographies of six female scientists, whose discoveries have had an immeasurable impact on the world, but due to their gender, have been forgotten by history.  This book includes biographies about Shark expert Eugenie Clark, Medical researcher Gertrude Elion and NASA ‘computer’ Katherine Coleman Johnson. This is an important book that needed to be written and read. It tells the story of six little known women pioneers in science. It’s important that their stories are told and that girls are actively encouraged to pursue STEM careers.

Each mini-biography is written with an interesting introductory scene of their most important achievement then gives a brief explanation of their lives. This is a longer read, but the women and fields of study are captivating. It’s incredible to think of how many women were able to move into scientific fields only because of WWII and the “Rosy the Riveter” era of letting women into the work force. I almost wish that this book would have focused in a little bit more on some of that background history. Also, the vocabulary is rather elevated with very few context clues or explanations, so if a younger student was reading this, they would need a lot of help.

I received this ARC copy from Myrick Marketing & Media, LLC and Holiday House via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

Categories: ARC, biographical, biography, book review, children, Children's literature, Children's Nonfiction, history, Middle grade, NetGalley, nonfiction, Science, STEM, women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Sing Freedom! by Vanita Oelschlager

25186289Sing Freedom! by Vanita Oelschlager is an inspiring a non-fiction story about Estonia, a small country near Russia, and its journey to regain independence after years of communist invasion. The book contained a great amount of historical information as well as geographical information. Invaded by USSR and Germany during WW2, communism later led to the demise of Estonia’s flag, songs and customs. This is the story of how the people of Estonia revolted in song instead of violent actions

The story tells how Estonia, a small European country, won its freedom from the former Soviet Union by showing that the spirit of a people is stronger than tanks and bullets. They showed their spirit by singing together in song. It is a tastefully written and illustrated book for children about the unique singing revolution vs. a violent revolution that could have resulted in bloodshed. The illustrations are well done and easily communicate the mood with the colors and human expressions. A great book to use to discuss revolution and how to change something peacefully.

I received this ARC copy from Vanita Books via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

Categories: ARC, biographical, book review, books, children, Children's literature, Children's Nonfiction, diversity, estonia, Europe, European, freedom, NetGalley, singing, Soviet Union, USSR, Vanita Books | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

How Different It Was: Canadians at the Time of Confederation

31252292How Different It Was: Canadians at the Time of Confederation is a wonderful book that focuses on the who, the why, and the how as it pertains to the Confederation in Canadian history. The book gives the reader a glimpse into Canadian confederation life.

How Different It Was focuses on how people lived, interacted, their interests, how they entertained, how they treated one another, and how animals were treated. The author does an excellent job of outlining an overview of the many peoples who came to Canada to settle, and demonstrates how it’s distinctively rural life differed both from British and American models over the years. The author focuses on troubling aspects of Canadian history such as treatment of First Nation peoples, and how long it took to begin to redress the mistreatment.

I received an ARC copy from Dundurn and A J. Patrick Boyer Book via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

Categories: A J. Patrick Boyer Book, ARC, book review, books, Canada, children, Children's literature, Children's Nonfiction, culture, Dundurn, education, history, NetGalley | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Sea Otter Heroes The Predators That Saved an Ecosystem by Patricia Newman

cover107826-mediumSea Otter Heroes: The Predators That Saved an Ecosystem by Patricia Newman is a nonfiction children’s book, which has an interesting story to tell. The ecosystem of California’s Elkhorn Slough showed some abnormalities. The seagrass was unusually healthy, considering the pollution that drained into the slough. As marine biologist Brent Hughes investigated, he found complex relationships among various plant and animal species in the region, including sea otters. Sea Otter Heroes emphasizes the scientific methodology involved in Hughes’s work, and thoroughly explains the connections between the biota under study. The sea otters are important players in the story, but they are not the primary focus suggested by the title.

Featuring an extremely cute sea otter on the cover, this upper elementary read documents the biologists process, describes the problem and lets the reader see for themselves the results. There’s even a “do it yourself ecosystem mini experiment” at the back of the book for budding environmentalists (involving spiders and crickets and grasshoppers). A superb example of the scientific process in action. Pages are full of captioned photographs, sidebars, charts, and graphs. Also includes tips to protect the environment, source notes, index, a glossary and bibliography, plus a list of books and website sources to find out more.

The book is not for young children as there is a lot of text and detail, but certainly middlegrade students studying ecosystems would get a lot out of this book. The photographs add so much to the book and make it easier to understand.

I received this ARC from Lerner Publishing Group and Hillbrook Press via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

Categories: animals, book review, books, California, children, Children's Fiction, Children's Nonfiction, ecosystem, Hillbrook Press, Lerner Publishing Group, nature, NetGalley, otters, Outdoors & Nature, Review | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Children of the Past: Archaeology and the Lives of Kids by Lois Miner Huey

cover107828-mediumChildren of the Past: Archaeology and the Lives of Kids by Lois Miner Huey is a nonfiction children’s book that introduces young readers to both the methods of archaeologists and to the lives of children throughout Western history, focusing specifically on:
• Western Europe 18,000 B.C.E.
• Hunter-Gatherers Europe 6000 B.C.E.
• Iroquois North America 1000 C.E.
• Jamestown Colony Virginia 1600s
• Free African-American settlement of Fort Mose Florida 1700s

There are not many books that focus on archaeology for kids. Huey uses graphics throughout.  Each section begins with a map to place the location in context and the book is filled with color photographs of cave art, digs, stone tools, pots, and other artifacts.

The book covers the basics of life in the time periods, focusing on what archaeology reveals was the role of children in their respective societies. For example, how scientists have proven that much cave art was produced by children or the possible training children went through to learn how to make stone tools or clay pots.  Huey does a nice job in beginning with each section with a brief second person narrative.

The book is not long but it is heavy information.

I received this ARC from Lerner Publishing Group and Hillbrook Press via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

Categories: book review, books, children, Children's literature, Children's Nonfiction, Hillbrook Press, history, Lerner Publishing Group, NetGalley, Review | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Animals Do, Too!: How They Behave Just Like You by Etta Kaner, Marilyn Faucher

31934707Animals Do, Too!: How They Behave Just Like You by Etta Kaner, Marilyn Faucher is very informative book with beautiful illustrations. The book is fun and engaging, which allows  the reader to discovers how similar humans and animals act. 

The illustrations are colorful and bright, and help to compare kids and animals doing the same activity. I liked that the kids are shown in different spaces, like a park, beach or their home, and accompanied by their family and friends. Each animal is also portrayed in its environment and surrounded by their own. Beautiful picture book.

 This book combines an adorable, easy to read picture book with nonfiction and unique information about animals. The animal facts are presented in a manner that a young child can understand.  I appreciate the added facts about the animals at the end; however, some are redundant. 

At the end the author has listed more interesting facts about the animals she has included in her book. It is a wonderful picture book from cover to cover and I highly recommend it.

I received this book from Kids Can Press via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

Categories: animals, book review, books, children, Children's literature, Children's Nonfiction, education, Kids Can Press, NetGalley, nonfiction | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Animal Planet Baby Animals by Dorothea Deprisco, Animal Planet

30842589Animal Planet: Animal Bite, Baby Animals by Dorothea Deprisco, Animal Planet is a book about various animal species family life. It talks about live and egg birth, how long babies stay with their parents, what they eat, where they live, how they travel and more.

The photos in this book are vibrant. They are close that you feel as if you can touch the animals.

There are some special sections on that side of the page that that include cool animal facts, simple infographics, and illustrated maps of the Earth and the habitats as well as the short bits on “All Grown Up”. The special sections will invite discussion and further investigation. They even have bits on “Just like Humans” where they show how human families interact in some of the various topics.

On the top of the page there are activities, further resources and an extensive Glossary.

I received the advanced reader’s copy from Time Inc. Books and Animal Planet via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

 

Categories: animal planet, animals, book review, books, children, Children's literature, Children's Nonfiction, education, family, NetGalley | Tags: , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Banana-Leaf Ball by Katie Smith Milway

cover100356-mediumThe Banana-Leaf Ball by Katie Smith Milway is book is based on a real refuge camp in East Africa and a boy whose life got better when the sport of soccer was introduced to the children. The coaches from the organization Right to Play taught kids how to get along by playing together.

The main character, Deo Rukundo, an East African boy is forced to flee his home because of a war in his country. He ends up separated from his family and keeps running deep into the forest for safety. After many weeks where he lives on dew drops, wild fruits and leaves he finds his way to a refugee camp in Northwest Tanzania. Frightened, homesick and alone, he prays for the well-being of the rest of his family.

With little resources in the refugee camp bullies emerge and vandalize those living there. They steal and intimidate everyone and they especially target Deo. Remy the gang leader is menacing and poses threats to all those he encounters.

One day a coach arrives and gathers up the children to play a game of soccer.  He hesitates about joining in the game but his excitement overcomes him and he touts his excellent soccer skills in front of the coach. Very impressed, the coach makes Deo captain of the “shirts” team. As the game progresses brand new feelings of comradery and acceptance emerge from the players as they work together as a team to score that winning goal. The kids start to laugh, forget their worries and relax. They area transformed into” kids” once again.

In the following days the kids gather at Deo’s house and he teaches them his soccer moves and how to make a ball out of dried banana leaves. Most importantly they open up to each other about their feelings and share their experiences both before refugee camp and the life they are living now.

This book is based upon a true story. It is heartwarming and inspiring. It points out that truly frightening, seemingly hopeless situations can indeed be turned around into something positive and bearable for those caught in such tragic circumstances.

The book is a perfect catalyst to get kids talking about others less fortunate and the social justice issues that surround refugees all over the world. It allows them to discuss the handling of bullies and the value of sports, teamwork, sharing with each other and acceptance.

I received this ARC book from Kids Can press via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

Categories: Adventure, Africa, African American Literature, book review, books, bullying, children, Children's literature, Children's Nonfiction, culture, friendships, Katie Smith Milway, Luke Refugee Camp, Lukole, Lukole refugee camp, Middle grade, NetGalley, refugee, refugee camp, Relationships, Review, The Banana-Leaf Ball, true story | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: