Children of the Past: Archaeology and the Lives of Kids by Lois Miner Huey

cover107828-mediumChildren of the Past: Archaeology and the Lives of Kids by Lois Miner Huey is a nonfiction children’s book that introduces young readers to both the methods of archaeologists and to the lives of children throughout Western history, focusing specifically on:
• Western Europe 18,000 B.C.E.
• Hunter-Gatherers Europe 6000 B.C.E.
• Iroquois North America 1000 C.E.
• Jamestown Colony Virginia 1600s
• Free African-American settlement of Fort Mose Florida 1700s

There are not many books that focus on archaeology for kids. Huey uses graphics throughout.  Each section begins with a map to place the location in context and the book is filled with color photographs of cave art, digs, stone tools, pots, and other artifacts.

The book covers the basics of life in the time periods, focusing on what archaeology reveals was the role of children in their respective societies. For example, how scientists have proven that much cave art was produced by children or the possible training children went through to learn how to make stone tools or clay pots.  Huey does a nice job in beginning with each section with a brief second person narrative.

The book is not long but it is heavy information.

I received this ARC from Lerner Publishing Group and Hillbrook Press via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

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