Jerry’s Magic by W. W. Rowe

cover61752-mediumJerry’s Magic by W. W. Rowe is a fast moving children’s story set in the 1950s. The well drawn setting feels natural and contemporary. The characters are simple yet compelling. They have the innocence we expect from the characters in a Rockwell painting and, like those characters, they are inherently lovable. Don’t let the bucolic setting fool you, however. There are bullies in this paradise and Jerry must find a way to deal with them.

Jerry is a 10 year old boy whose father died in World War II. Jerry has cultivated a reputation at school of being a magician. He uses this reputation to protect himself and his friend Monty from bullies. He also uses this reputation to swindle his classmates. When his classmates, including the bullies, demand their money back from one of his swindles, Jerry seeks out the advice of the Wonder Worker, a vagrant named Wilcox. Wilcox provides Jerry with a magic box that will double his money each night so that Jerry will be able to pay back the bullies after 3 nights. The box does not come without strings attached, however. Jerry’s motives must be pure and he must learn to contact his higher self in order for the box to work.

This book is fast moving with a level of drama and a moral appropriate for tweens and preteens. It was very enjoyable.

I received this ARC from Larson Publications via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

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Categories: book review, books, Children's Fiction, Larson Publications, Middle grade, NetGalley, Review | Tags: , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

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